Tulips

Tyfu Cymru News Round-up

11th February – 17th February 2019

We hope you have all enjoyed sharing love this Valentine’s, and hopefully sharing some beautiful #BritishGrown flowers with your loved ones too?! We end the week by bringing you our favourite horticulture news items from the week.

#VegPower hits new high

It emerged this week that more than 80% of the UK grocery market has now made a commitment to boost vegetable consumption by signing up to the Peas Please initiative. This follows a report that only 9% of children are eating their 5 a day and according to Euromonitor the UK is the 8th worst in Europe for Fruit and Veg consumption – and it’s in decline.

Peas Please aim to reverse this trend and following its launch in 2017 the initiative has gained 41 pledgers, including Greggs, Birds Eye, Nestle, 80% of grocery market and Tyfu Cymru of course! The initiative has helped to sell nearly 4.8m additional portions of veg by helping to improve the availability, affordability and quality of the veg on offer. With the growing success of the newly launched #EatThemToDefeatThem campaign also playing its part we look forward to hearing the next update from Peas Please.

More than 80% of the UK grocery market has now made a commitment to boost vegetable consumption by signing up to the Peas Please initiative...

We were delightedto make our #vegpledge in 2017, and pleased to have made great progress in delivering since.https://t.co/zImogxhm1q?

— TyfuCymru (@TyfuCymru) February 13, 2019

A new survey shows only 9% of UK children are eating their 5-a-day and almost 50% of parents struggle to get their children to snack on fruit and vegetables.https://t.co/h12XDifYzw pic.twitter.com/pxeu1DLVjy

— TyfuCymru (@TyfuCymru) February 14, 2019

 

Extreme Weather threat to Ornamentals market?

A new report shows that growers have enjoyed a strong plant sales market in early 2019 - but still fear extreme weather events. It states that there is still some "trepidation" ahead of March after the very cold later spring of 2018 saw a 46% fall in plants sales in March 2018.

January's provisional UK mean temperature was 3.7 °C, which is equal to the 1981-2010 long-term average. It was a dry month except in parts of northern Scotland, with 52% of average rainfall overall, making it the 9th driest January in a series from 1910, and the driest since 2006.

Let's hope "the beast from the east" stays away this year, but just in case why don’t you check out this expert advice article in Horticulture Week which sets out how growers should plan for more frequent and extreme weather conditions. https://www.hortweek.com/business-planning-plan-extreme-weather/ornamentals/article/1522066

Ornamental growers have enjoyed strong plant sales in early 2019 - but still fear extreme weather. Last years cold spring saw a 46% fall in plant sales in March 2018.

Let's hope "the beast from the east" stays away this year! https://t.co/BudpW7FTMv

— TyfuCymru (@TyfuCymru) February 13, 2019

 

Do we know where our food comes from?

This week it was announced that A third of Brits believe sweet potato is traditionally grown in the UK, despite the majority of the produce actually coming from southern India. Other interesting stats include:

  • A fifth of Brits believe Swiss chard is cultivated in the UK
  • 12 per cent think the same about melon which is typically grown in warmer climates.
  • Six out of 10 of the British public have never considered where their groceries originate from

With new articles arising everyday debating the environmental impact of our food and the food miles involved with some of our favourite produce, should we be doing more to understand where our food comes from? How can we all help to educate the nation?

Do you know where your favourite fruit and vegetables are grown?

A recent study has found that many Brits are not aware of where their fruits and vegetables are grown...https://t.co/No3zVKbmTu

— TyfuCymru (@TyfuCymru) February 12, 2019

 

#GrownNotFlown this Valentine’s Day

Following the controversy back in 2014, when Interflora was forced to remove British labelling from bouquets after it emerged many of its flowers come from abroad, there has been a growing interest in flower ‘air-miles’, and in particular on Valentine’s Day. It was estimated that the flowers in the Interflora bouquet had travelled 188,447 miles!

Since then, British growers have been fighting back. The website flowersfromthefarm.co.uk  is a useful guide to finding suppliers of British-grown cut flowers and the florists who specialise in them. Local flowers stay fresher for longer by cutting out the long transportation times; it can take over a week from international flowers being cut to arriving in your home. Not to mention the environmental benefits of choosing home-grown over flown.

So did you buy or receive any #BritishGrown flowers for Valentine’s Day? Share a picture with us if so!

#HappyValentine's Day to all of our followers 💐🌷💕

Have you sent / received any #BritishGrown flowers today? #GrownnotFlown pic.twitter.com/WSXJzwky7s

— TyfuCymru (@TyfuCymru) February 14, 2019

 

Eating Vegetables good for mental well-being?

Consuming more fruit and vegetables can improve your mental well-being, according to a new study. Researchers have analysed data from more than 40,000 people in the UK, and found that changes in fruit and vegetable consumption are correlated with changes in mental well-being.

The research showed a positive association between the quantity of fruit and vegetables consumed and people's self-reported mental well-being. Specifically, the findings indicate that eating just one extra portion of fruits and vegetables a day could have an equivalent effect on mental well-being as around 8 extra days of walking a month (for at least 10 minutes at a time).

It was also reported that Fruit and veg can lower blood pressure...Increasing the consumption of potassium-rich natural foods can lower blood pressure and therefore reduce the risk of kidney and cardiovascular disease an US study shows. Please pass the spinach and bananas!

Horticultural therapy is a topic which has also been in the news, stating that there have been a plethora of studies and pilots in the green sector, looking at the effect of horticultural therapy — or the effect that simply working or being in green spaces has on people’s mental and physical health. Looks like there’s many benefits relating to Horticulture and positive mental well-being.

Did you know, eating fruit and vegetables can improve mental well-being?

Researchers from the University of Leeds have found, one extra portion of fruits and vegetables a day could have an equivalent effect as around 8 extra days of walking a month! https://t.co/vODeCKKM9Z pic.twitter.com/1mqDxFSadQ

— TyfuCymru (@TyfuCymru) February 14, 2019

Fruit and veg can lower blood pressure...

Increasing the consumption of potassium-rich natural foods can lower blood pressure and therefore reduce the risk of kidney and cardiovascular disease an US study shows.

Please pass the spinach and bananas !https://t.co/0G4SiANFAR pic.twitter.com/w8FH3c3uEU

— TyfuCymru (@TyfuCymru) February 15, 2019

Can social prescribing bring horticulture and health closer together? There have been many studies and pilots looking at horticultural therapy — or the effect that simply working or being in green spaces has on people’s mental and physical health...https://t.co/FWjqzsnNRf

— TyfuCymru (@TyfuCymru) February 6, 2019

We will be back next week with our next weekly round-up, but in the meantime you can keep up to date with our latest news and events by following us on: TwitterFacebook or Linkedin